Paul Davies on Faith and Science

Like 8 people have written me today to point me to the article in the NY Times by Paul Davies.

I was planning on writing up a post about it later on tonight or sometime tomorrow, but Chuck Blanchard has done such a great job of it, that I’ll just piggy back on his:

“Paul Davies, the director of Beyond, a research center at Arizona State University, and the author of Cosmic Jackpot: Why Our Universe Is Just Right for Life, has a very provocative op-ed in today’s New York Times that makes a very interesting claim–that science itself is the result of faith. He does so in a way very similar to my own thinking:

SCIENCE, we are repeatedly told, is the most reliable form of knowledge about the world because it is based on testable hypotheses. Religion, by contrast, is based on faith. The term ‘doubting Thomas’ well illustrates the difference. In science, a healthy skepticism is a professional necessity, whereas in religion, having belief without evidence is regarded as a virtue. “

Read the rest here.

Author: Nick Knisely

Episcopal bishop, dad, astronomer, erstwhile dancer...

1 thought on “Paul Davies on Faith and Science”

  1. “SCIENCE, we are repeatedly told, is the most reliable form of knowledge about the world because it is based on testable hypotheses.”
    This is a great myth! Who believes scientists? Look at Global Warming… who believes the scientists? Look at Peak Oil? Who believes the geologists?
    People again and again are making decisions based on other grounds that these [testable hypotheses] all the time. And these are educated people too. So, what is really working in today’s world of decision making as regards discernment / insight?
    I don’t know for sure, but I don’t think it is science or the scientists.
    I think this is a separate matter from that which Davies addresses… and you too. Two cents worth of something else.

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