How to leave a comment on The Episcopal Cafe

Helen Thompson, one of the News Editors on the Lead (a part of the Episcopal Cafe), has written up some extraordinarily clear instructions about how to register an account with Typekey that will let you then post to the Cafe’s blogs (and other blogs on the internet – like mine here for instance…)

“We periodically get asked the question: How do I comment on the Episcopal Cafe?

Here’s how:

Visit https://www.typekey.com/t/typekey/register?lang=en-us

Set up your account. To ensure that you’re ALWAYS authorized to post to the Cafe, include your real name in your registration, either under ‘display name’ or ‘membername’. Even though Typekey says it will not publish your real name unless you choose to, the Episcopal Cafe’s Ethic of Transparency requires that you use your real name in order to have your comments published on the site. You may wish to register an id specifically for interacting with the Cafe if you have a ‘handle’ you use elsewhere.

The first few times you post, it may take a while for your comment to show up. Never fear! We keep an eye out and have to hand-approve people their first time round. But if you start commenting regularly, you’ll get a status that will allow your comments to appear instantly.”

When you got to post a note or comment on the Cafe blogs, you’ll be told to “login” first. Clicking the login link will take you to a typekey page where you enter your newly registered name and password. I usually tick the “keep me logged in for two weeks” box, hit the button, and off I go…

Author: Nicholas Knisely

Episcopal bishop, dad, astronomer, erstwhile dancer...

3 thoughts on “How to leave a comment on The Episcopal Cafe”

  1. Ruidh: I made a case for that when we were discussing the policy. But look for a post from me on how allowing myself to be Helen Thompson AND Gallycat changed my career for the better on the Daily Episcopalian, I think on Wednesday.
    But the barriers to post comments are meant to help moderate the community and prevent frivolity or anonymous causticity. To say nothing of avoiding spam. At least, that’s how I understand our Ethic of Transparency: at certain Other Newsblogs, people are free to say hateful things without ever owning up to who they are.

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